Posts

Tim Noble & Sue Webster

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 Tim Noble & Sue Webster  Tim Noble and Sue Webster are London-based artists whose work combines assemblage, light, shadow and humor.  As Nick Cave writes in the introduction of their 2011 book British Rubbish , the art of Tim Noble & Sue Webster needs little explanation: The work stands before us - powerful, potent, funny and subversive. There is a danger that words would diminish it.  Dirty White Trash (With Gulls) - Tim Noble & Sue Webster, 1998 www.timnobleandsuewebster.com 6 months' worth of artists' trash, 2 taxidermy seagulls, light projector. They aggregate objects and debris into self-deprecating works that bridge two realities. At first glance, we see jumbled piles of trash, the familiar by-products of a throw-away society. The piles evoke the aftermath of a binge, the hangover from a party that went on too long. We soon discover, however, that the piles are in fact precise constructions that cast crisp, figurative shadows under directed light - artworksfo

HOLIDAY SPECIAL

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How can we be more sustainable this festive season?  I’ve put together some friendly advice to help making environmentally sound decisions more convenient for you. First, a couple of great websites for online retail. Next, my 5 top tips for low-impact celebrations.  I encourage you to embrace change as it is inevitable and necessary. The time of buying, giving and consuming is upon us again and provides us with the perfect opportunity to put into practice some thoughtfulness and compassion.  Let's adopt some fabulously kind behaviours this season. The Ethical Consumer is a comprehensive resource for anything retail-related and scores brands on their ethics.  I highly recommend you make this one of your go-to websites as they  provide all the tools and resources you need to make choices at the checkout simple, informed and effective.   https://www.ethicalconsumer.org/ Buycott is an app that helps you vote with your wallet. Join campaigns to support causes that you care about, t

Collage

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Collage  Below are some examples of using the collage technique to raise awareness about plastic pollution. Simply glue the plastic items to a surface, I like to use drift wood. Either paint the surface first of leave it as it is. Experiment with different glues. PVA is flexible but takes longer to dry. Wood contact glue works very well but has slightly brownish yellow colour. Super glue is good but can be brittle. See what works best for you.  As glue is also a type of plastic, you might want to avoid it. In that case, h ave a look here for some different techniques such as installation art and mosaics.  Squid Lures - Nina Clayton, 2018  The Ocean is Crying -  Nina Clayton 2017 Plastictopus -   Nina Clayton  2019 Don't think they will forgive you, Detail  - Nina Clayton, 2020  Nina with Ocean Crying II, exhibited in Phnom Penh  Irrawady - Nina Clayton 2020  Don't think they will forgive you - Nina Clayton, 2020   Plastic Turtle - Nina Clayton 2019 Hang On - Nina Clayton, 2017

Mosaic & Weaving

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 Mosaic & Weaving The technique used in these artworks is similar to tiling. Mix concrete powder with sand, make wet and lay out a layer as thick as the height of the plastic bottle caps. Make sure the bottle caps are full of concrete as you push them down. This will prevent them from cracking if they are in a place where people will walk on them. Just before the concrete is completely dry, clean off the excess with a rag or sponge.  Working on a plastic bottle cap mosaic at Marine Conservation Cambodia, 2018 Mosaic mural at Pura Vida, Koh Phi Phi 2018 Bottle cap Mandala - Koh Tao 2018 Tile mosaic Koh Tao, 2018 Bottle cap mural Pura Vida, Koh Phi Phi 2018 Hopscotch - MCC, 2018  Blue Whale - Nina Clayton, 2019  Yellow & White - MCC, 2018  Garden Table - Rick Clayton, 2018 Blue Wave - Nina Clayton, 2018  Garden Table - Rick Clayton, 2018 Rainbow Step - MCC, 2018  Flower Power - MCC, 2018  Yellow & Green Step - MCC, 2018  Turtle - Nina Clayton 2019 Weaving  Here is a unique an

Installation

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 Installation Installation art refers to 3 dimensional art that is site-specific. Often, photography is used to reproduce and represent the installations.  Here, pieces of beach plastic are positioned in a harmonious formation and then photographed.   Washed Ashore - MCC volunteers photo by Nina Clayton, 2018  Toothbrush Army - Nina Clayton, 2018 Floating Blackout - Louise Wauters & Nina Clayton, 2018  Dozens of plastic fishing net floats collected from the beaches of Koh Seh in Cambodia are tied together to create a wall of sorts. Mixing art and functionality to upcycle polluting plastic litter, and stir up some behaviour change in the observer. Can be seen Marine Conservation Cambodia.   Attack of the Sporks - Nina Clayton 2018 This photo series was made by erecting in the sand a collection of spoons and forks found on the beach. The sheer volume of similar objects, along with the different angles of photography, create an effect of invasion and overwhelm.  Plastic Stupa - Nina C